Haute Kippy is all about crochet, crafting, sewing, baking, and simple homemade living.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Pom Pom Boot Cuffs


Happy New Year! It's the beginning of my third year in the adventures of crochet and my second year blogging about them. Here for you, to ease your winter blues is my 11th original crochet pattern, and the first pattern of the new year, my Pom Pom Boot Cuffs!

I love winter time. I love snow, and I love wearing boots. I think it's safe to say I have boot cuff mania! I've been having so much fun re-sizing my Sweet Scallops boot cuff pattern and giving them to my friends. I even made tiny toddler sized boot cuffs for my little one. They are so small, so cute, and they work up so quickly, I made her pairs in six different colors! I just cant't get enough. So I sought to create a new original design, and when inspiration struck the Pom Poms were born. They're fun because the poofs on the design made me think of tiny little pom poms.



Initially, I had another name picked out, but while writing this, something told me to "google it". When I did, I discovered that what I intended to christen these cuffs was a reference to the unsavory in certain cultures. Yikes! (you can laugh, I am!) That would be just the kind of comical calamity to befall me, even if self-induced. When I read those salacious entries on Urban Dictionary I heard the voice of the legendary George Takei in my head saying "OH NO!". What had I gotten myself into? And I had already teased them on Facebook under that indecorous moniker! I hit save, ran to Facebook and edited the post. Needless to say, crisis averted. I wasn't even going to tell you but, it's too funny!

Now good and properly named, the Pom Pom Boot Cuffs are definitely cute, and super fluffy. They work up quick- even quicker in toddler size- and are very fun to make when you get the hang of the pattern. Once I started making them, I just couldn't stop.


I love the way these toddler sized cuffs look in the flecked yarn.


While working up the pattern, I got progressively more creative with them and introduced color changes. If you want to get fancy, switch colors on the pom poms to make them pop. The color combinations one could come up with are truly endless, and the possibilities are exciting.

A neon variegated with hot pink pom poms and edging detail in child size.


Worked with an H hook in any worsted yarn, these cuffs feature ribbing at the base, and then graduate into two rows of soft and puffy pom poms. A round of slip stitching at the top gives them an extra little something as a neat and tidy finishing detail. A very posh crocheter could employ an invisible join in the slip stitching round to make a seamless finish.

This heather gray in an adult size is cute too, though some may prefer the design just for juveniles because its so quirky and fun.


This is the first time I've included multiple sizes in one of my patterns. I've followed professionally written patterns like this before and I am pretty sure I've done it right. If not, I'm sure someone will be kind enough to chime in with a fix!

Now let's get started and pop out some pom poms...

If you make a pair be sure to share your work on my Facebook page, find me on Ravelry or leave a comment. I'm here to help with any questions you may have.

Happy Hooking!
xo- Bethany

Pom Pom Boot Cuffs Free Crochet Pattern:




Hook: H

Yarn: Worsted

Gauge: 2 Rows, 4 sts in HDC = 1”

Special Stitches:

Bobble Stitch - yo, insert hook into next st, yo, draw up loop, yo, draw thru two loops, *yo, insert hook into same st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw thru two loops*, repeat** two more times, (5 loops on hook) yo, draw thru all loops. Bobble will poof out behind work.

Sc inc- single crochet increase, make two sc in the the next st.

Resizing: Bobble pattern is a multiple of 3. For ribbing, 2 rows = 3 sts


Note: Pattern is written in three sizes, Toddler, Child and Adult. Stitch counts are denoted as follows: T (Ch, A). Simply make the appropriate number of stitches or rows for the size you wish to make when following the pattern.


Cuff:

Chain 7 (9, 12)

Row 1: hdc in the back bump of the third ch from hook, and in each ch across for a total of 5 (7, 10) sts, ch 2, turn.

Row 2: working in back loops only (blo), hdc in each st across, ch 2, turn. 5 (7, 10) sts total.

Rows 3-15 (17, 23): repeat row 2.

At end of last row, ch 1, bring ends together to form a tube, sl st across through blo and flo of both ends. 5 (7, 10) sl sts. Pivot the cuff with right side facing to work around the raw edge, ch 1, sl st evenly around (apx. 3 sts every 2 rows) for a total of 23 (26, 35) sl sts around. Ch 1, do not join.

Round 1: sc in the next st, and in each st around for a total of 23 (26, 35) sts. Join to first sc with a sl st, ch 1.

Round 2: sc (in same st as join, here and throughout) in the first st and in each of the next 4 (5, 8) sts, sc inc in the next st, sc in each of the next 4 (5, 8) sts, sc inc in the next st, sc in each of the next 4 (5, 8) sts, sc inc in the next st, sc in each of the next 4 (5, 7) sts, sc inc in the next st, sc in each of the remaining 3 (2, 0) sts, join with a sl st to the first sc, ch 1, turn. 27 (30, 39) total sts.

Round 3: sc in first st, bobble in the next st, *sc in each of the next 2 sts, bobble in the next st*, repeat ** around 9 (10, 13) times until 1 st remains, sc in the last st, join to first sc with a sl st, ch 1, turn.

Rounds 4-5: sc in each st around for a total of 27 (30, 39) sts, join with a sl st to the first sc, ch 1, do not turn.

Round 6: turn, repeat round 3.

Round 7: sc in each st around, join to first sc with a sl st, and then continue to sl st loosely around top of cuff, join to beg sl st, fo, weave in ends.



© Haute Kippy 2017


You may sell items made from this pattern, but please be courteous, always credit Haute Kippy with the original design and link to my blog when possible.

Original pattern "Pom Pom Boot Cuffs"  copyright Haute Kippy by Bethany Sypolt 2017

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Corn on the Cob

Thanksgiving is over and I'm officially in Christmas mode! I've secretly been in Christmas mode since shortly after Halloween, but I don't let my freak flag fly til Thanksgiving. I love decorating. I have a myriad of decorations which I mix and match, creating a unique design every year. When it comes to Christmas ornaments, I can get very sentimental. I have ornaments from my grandparents that have been on a tree every Christmas since my mother was a little girl. I have treasured hand made ornaments, collectibles, mementos made by my children, and ones made by me when I was a child. It's a beautiful and well loved collection. Some of my most fond memories of Christmases at my grandparents' house with my cousins are of us kids crafting ornaments together. I still love making ornaments!

Recently I've been seeing crocheted ornaments on social media, and it inspired me to design my own! I asked my family what ornament they would like to see. My daughter suggested a tree, but everyone makes trees. I said I wanted to make something original and cute. My genius husband then chimed in, "Hey make a corn cob!". We laughed, and then I began to think. The corn cob is by no means "Christmassy" but it's adorable, comical, yummy and delightfully unexpected! Intrigued, I decided to go for it.




I'm no amigurumi expert, but I have made a few things. The basics are simple. Amigurumi are worked in the round, rounds are not joined (stitch markers are a must). Items are stuffed with your basic poly-fill, sewn shut and voila- you have an adorable crocheted plush toy!


Now, keep in mind, I'M LEFT HANDED! Shocker. I know. My cousin who is my right handed pattern tester has just come to a startling conclusion. Some of the things she makes from my patterns come out backwards, or inside out! I noticed over the years, that some things I make from other people's right-handed patterns come out backwards or inside out! Amigurumi included. She and I put two and two together and figured it out. I'M LEFT HANDED. There's nothing we can do about this.

If you're also left handed. You probably work my patterns like a dream. If you're right handed and you've made one of my patterns before, you might have noticed something off, or funny about them. This is the problem. Well, it's not really a problem, just a little hurdle we can jump together. Right-handers, don't fret, just turn whatever looks weird inside out, or turn it around, or wear it on the other hand. Boom. Problem solved. I'll be making notes on previous pattern posts when I get the chance. We never knew what was off before. Isn't life funny? And we wonder why they say left-handers live on average 9 less years than right handed persons. It is indeed a fallen world we live in. Woe unto me and my south paw brethren. (Kidding!)

Pity party aside- I mean upside down (left handed crocheting joke, insert laughter here) this corn on the cob is really fun, and really easy to make. It works up quickly and makes an adorable festive addition to your family tree. It's the cutest conversation starter your holiday party ever had!

Enjoy!

xo- Kip


Corn on the Cob Christmas Ornament 


FREE Crochet Pattern




Hook: G6/4MM
Yarn: any worsted in yellow and green
Notions: Stitch Markers, yarn needle, small amount of stuffing/poly-fill

Notes: On cob, be sure to mark the first stitch of each round, as you will not be joining rounds, but continuing the work by making the first stitch of the next round on the first stitch of the last round. This will eliminate an unsightly seam on the toy. On husk you will be working into both sides of the beginning chain forming a u shape. Spikes on the husk are formed similar to picots, or points on a star. Once the spike is made, it is sl st into place where indicated. Work continues around outside of husk in rows.

Cob: use yellow
Begin with a magic ring.
Rnd 1: sc 10 into the ring.
Rnd 2: *sc, make 2 sc  in the next st*, repeat** around. (15 sts)
Rnd 3: *sc in each of the next two sts, make 2 sc in the next st* repeat ** around. (20 sts)
Rnds 4: working in blo, sc in each st around (20 sts)
Rnds 5-13: sc in each st around. (20 sts)
Rnds 14-23: sc2tog, then sc in each st around. (10 sts by round 23)
Pause to stuff
Rnd 24: sc2tog around.  (5 sts)
Join with a sl st. Break yarn leaving long tail and sew small hole closed. Weave in ends.

Husk: use green
Ch 14 (work into   w back bump of chain)
Row 1: dc in third ch from hook, dc in each of the next 10 chs, make 7 dc in last ch, pivot work, (continue by working back up the other side of the chain, into the "v"s) dc in each of the 11 remaining chs, do not turn, ch 4, sc in second ch from hook, hdc in the next ch, dc in the last ch, sl st to top of beg ch, ch 4, sc in the second ch from hook, hdc in the next ch, dc in the last ch, sl st to top of first dc. Do not turn, keep right side facing.

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as first dc), dc in first st, dc in each of the next 13 sts, make 2 dc in next st, 2 dc in the next, 2 dc in the next st, dc in each of the next 13 sts, do not turn.

Row 3: ch 4, sc in second ch from hook, hdc, in the next ch, dc in the last ch, turn, dc in each of the next 13 sts, dc 2 in the next st, dc 2 in the next st, dc in each of the next 3 sts, dc 2 in the next st, dc 2 in the next st, dc in each of the next 12 sts, do not turn, ch 4, sc in second ch from hook, hdc in the next ch, dc in the last ch, sl st to turning chain of previous row, FO weave in ends.

Construction:
Nestle corn cob inside husk and using green, sew husk to cob. Add loop to hang if using as an ornament.

Have fun giggling and enjoying your corn cob, and watching other people's expression as they notice it hanging from the tree!





Friday, November 18, 2016

Quick Mitts

Phew! October came and went, didn't it!? Sorry for my little hiatus, I hate leaving ya'll hanging when I know you want more quality free accessory designs! I had A LOT going on last month. My daughter had so many football games to cheer, I needed to sew my girls some Halloween costumes, and I had a very large crochet order come through that I'm almost (mercifully) done with. I admit I kinda got burnt out and I took a small vacation from crocheting as well. It didn't last long though! A few days later I was jonesing to pick up my hooks again. When this happens, I always make sure to treat myself by making something I WANT - FOR ME! This is a good lesson to learn in life in general, especially for mothers/fathers/primary care givers (you know who you are and how hard you work). You can't take care of everything and everyone unless you're taking care of yourself too! Remember that!

I'm a big fan of Bethany Dearden (and not just because we have the same name!) and her blog Whistle and Ivy. She recently unveiled an adorable CAL (i.e. Crochet-A-Long) of a Nativity of the Holy Family just in time for Christmas decorating. So, I made my stalker-like love of her official and signed up for her newsletter to make sure I would not miss a piece. Needless to say, it's SUPER cute. You should really make yourself a set. Your kids will love playing with the little figures!

To whet my appetite for getting back into crocheting,
I made this precious crochet Nativity from Whistle and Ivy.
Now I'm finishing up my big custom order and I decided I needed to share with you these quick and simple mittens. I call them "Quick Mitts". Tres original, no?



Lets face it, everyone has a smart phone. Gone are the days when a super soft comfy warm pair of mittens will do the trick. You'll wear them once and then realize you have to take them completely off to use your phone. This is less than desirable. So here's my solution. Get the look you love, comfort you crave and the warmth you want out of a crocheted pair of mittens with all the fun, flair and phone access you need!

These are a much, much simplified version of my cable design gloves, The Chrissy. They work up really quickly thanks to fluffy worsted yarn with the help of the taller half double crochet stitch. It's like my favorite stitch ever. (move over double crochet- your days are numbered)

You can make these as a gift in any color, and they will stretch to fit most hands comfortably. The best feature is, you can make them as long or as short as you want. Go almost full finger coverage, or barely there for warmer days! You decide!

Here's a pair I made for myself with luxurious Yarn Bee Glowing variegated in Mariposa Prairie 


I made the fingers and thumbs very tall for maximum warmth and I can tuck my finger tips down in the gloves when I need to, or keep them out to use my phone at any time, without the hassle of a flip over finger panel. I've tried them, they're a pain! And they stretch out. Not a fan.


I guarantee you'll be a fan of these gloves, though! 


Once you get the hang of this simple pattern, you'll want to make multiple pairs for everyone you love!


Enjoy this Quick Mitts FREE glove pattern. Please share your results on my Facebook page, and be sure to look me up on Ravelry as well. I'm here to help so any comments, questions or feedback are always welcome!

It's almost Christmastime so get to craftin' people!

 xo- Kip


Quick Mitts Free Pattern:

Quick Mitts


Hook: H/8 5mm
Yarn: Any Worsted
Gauge: 13 sts, 9 rows = 4” in HDC
Notions: Yarn needle
Difficulty: Easy

Notes: Left and Right Hand gloves are made identically, except for thumb hole round. See instructions for more details. Joined rounds are worked as follows: make first hdc in next st (after join), at round end, make final hdc in join st. Length of finger and thumb coverage is totally customizable- simply add or delete rounds for a custom look!

Abbreviations:
Blo- crochet in back loop only
Hdc- half double crochet
Ch- chain
Sl st- slip stitch


Cuff:
Row 1: Ch 9, hdc in third ch from hook, and in each ch across, turn. (7 hdc)
Row 2: Ch 2, hdc in blo across. (7 sts)
Row 3-15: repeat row 2.

Fold cuff in half, matching up stitches, sl st evenly through stitches on both edges to form a tube. Do not break yarn. Turn tube 90 degrees so raw edge faces up, ch 1.

Glove:
Round 1: Working loosely along raw edge of cuff tube, sl st evenly around making 23 sts in total. Do not join, ch 1.
Round 2: Hdc in next st (the first sl st made in previous rnd), hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc)
*Throughout pattern, at join ch 1 and st in next st, at round end, make last st of rnd in join st.
Round 3-7: Hdc in the next stitch, and in each st around, join, ch 1.

Thumb Hole:
Round 8: FOR RIGHT HAND GLOVE- Hdc in first 2 sts, ch 4, sk next 4 sts, hdc in remaining 17 sts, join, ch 1.

Round 8 FOR LEFT HAND GLOVE- Hdc 17, ch 4, sk next 4 sts, hdc in last 2 sts, join, ch 1.

Glove Continued:
Rounds 9-13: hdc in the next st, and in each st around, join, ch 1.

For more finger coverage, crochet an additional 1-3 rows as desired.

Break yarn.

Finishing:
Join at bottom edge of thumb hole, and hdc evenly around as follows: hdc 4 along edge, hdc 2 along side of hole, hdc 4 along top of hole, hdc 2 along side of hole, join, ch 1. (12 sts)
Work up thumb hole an additional 1-3 rounds as desired for more or less thumb coverage.

FO weave in ends.


© Haute Kippy 2016

You may sell items made from this pattern, but please be courteous, always credit Haute Kippy with the original design and link to my blog when possible.

Original pattern ‘Quick Mitts’’
copyright Haute Kippy by Bethany Sypolt 2016







Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Guest Post- Sweet Scallops Boot Cuffs on Stitch and Unwind

I'm so excited! I've just done my first ever guest post! I wrote for and debuted my newest pattern on the Stitch and Unwind crochet and knitting blog.


And, I'm so excited to share this adorable new pattern with you. I know you'll be clamoring to make multiple pairs of these sweet little boot cuffs.

As always it's a FREE pattern, but...

If you'd like to support Haute Kippy and help me keep rolling out the new designs, I've got a sleek, beautiful, ad-free, printer friendly version of the Sweet Scallops Boot Cuffs pattern available here.
You can own a copy of this pattern, view it offline and be a smart and savvy crocheter on the go! (not to mention a beautiful, generous, kind crocheter... is it working? *wink *smile *blows kisses) I heart You!

You're the best!


Now would you just look at these beautiful cuffs? They will look super cute in any color. You can make them with any worsted yarn and a G hook. They work up so soft and supple and have a distinctly feminine look which complements any outfit. I just love the way those little scallops peek out from under the boots!


I even made a mini-version for my daughter. The pattern is very easy to scale up or down for a custom fit in any size. I can't get enough of that Red Heart With Love Metallic yarn, it is so luscious looking!


Now, without any further ado, please click the link below to be redirected to the Stitch and Unwind blog where you can view and create the newest design from Haute Kippy, the Sweet Scallops Boot Cuffs.

Enjoy my guest post!
xo-Kip

Click HERE to Get Free Pattern- Sweet Scallops Boot Cuffs Guest Post on Stitch and Unwind!


Thursday, August 25, 2016

Chrissy's Cabled Fingerless Gloves


These fingerless gloves with cute "cable knit" design will make a comfy addition to your fall accessories collection.





These are my first gloves! They have been a labor of love and my most challenging design and pattern written to date! But don't fear, the hard work has all been done for you. And draft after draft, version after version, the pattern is finally, *hopefully* flawless. They are a breeze to construct and for gloves, they work up surprisingly quickly. 

Half Double Crochet Construction

Other mittens and gloves I've made are usually in single crochet, and my goodness- they take forever to make! These are different- I think working in half double makes all the difference. Not only is it a thicker and taller stitch, thus reducing the number of rows needed; it is a much more attractive stitch in my opinion.

These were worked using Red Heart With Love in Tan. I just love this yarn it is so soft and thick and very nice looking. It gives your projects a more polished look. It really is one of my go-to yarns.

Cuff and Loop Closure


These gloves were created after a special request by a friend of mine for some easy on, comfy and not-too-tight fingerless gloves for fall and into winter. As I began searching around I found lots of basic looking gloves and mittens, and I just was not feeling any of them. I wanted to make her something special and new. It turns out, she has helped me as much as I have helped her- by giving me this idea! An idea which has blossomed into a gorgeous original design that I'm so excited to share with you!


Cabled Design


Cable knit designs are some of my favorite, and in crochet, we can't "cable knit" but we can still stitch in "cabled" designs. I can't take credit for coming up with the loop weaving cabling idea. It came from a book filled with different patterns and techniques (and full credit is given on the written pattern). I adapted this technique for use on my gloves and it came out stunningly! 



I hope you enjoy making your own gloves just in time for fall, and I know they will look beautiful in any variety of colors and yarns! I would love to see a picture of your gloves, be sure to post and share on my Facebook page. The pattern will also be available on Ravelry so be sure to add it to your queue! Also don't be shy- if you have any questions or comments or corrections for this pattern leave me a comment and we'll work together to make it right!

Enjoy! and Happy hooking!

xo- Kip


Chrissy's Cabled Fingerless Gloves FREE Pattern



You may sell items made from this pattern, but please be courteous, always credit Haute Kippy with the original design and link to my blog when possible.



Hook: H/8 5mm
Yarn: Any Worsted
Gauge: 13 sts, 9 rows = 4” in HDC
Notions: Yarn needle, 1” button
Difficulty: Easy

Notes: Worked in one piece from bottom up. Alternating work in back and front loops creates striped pattern on cuff. Forming and weaving loops on glove creates a “cable knit” looking design. Loop and button on open ended cuff add visual interest to the design. This design should fit an average sized hand apx. 7 ½” across knuckles when crocheted somewhat loosely.

Abbreviations:
Flo- crochet in front loop only
Blo- crochet in back loop only
Hdc- half double crochet
Ch- chain
Sl st- slip stitch

Right Hand

Cuff:
Row 1: Ch 21, sc in second ch from hook, sc in each of the next 5 chs, sk the next 10 chs, sc in the last 5 chs.
Row 2: Working in flo, sc in each st across, ch 1, turn.
Row 3: Working in blo, sc in each st across, ch 1, turn.
Rows 4-23: Repeat rows 2 and 3.
Pivot work in order to crochet along row edges, keep right side facing, do not break yarn.

Glove:
Round 1: Working loosely, make 1 sl st in the end of each row across the unfinished edge of the cuff, join with a sl st to the first sl st made, ch 1, do not turn. (23 sts)
Round 2: Hdc in same st as join (here and throughout right hand), and in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc)
Round 3: Hdc in each of the first 8 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the last 11 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc and 2 ch-10 loops)
Rounds 4 and 5: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.
Round 6: Hdc in each of the first 10 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the last 9 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc and 2 ch-10 loops)
Round 7: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.
Round 8: Hdc in each of the first 2 sts, ch 4, sk the next 4 sts, hdc in each of the remaining 17 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (Thumb hole made)
Round 9: Hdc in each of the first 2 sts, hdc in each of the next 4 chs, hdc in each of the next 6 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the last 7 sts, sl st to join, ch 1.
Rounds 10-12: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.

Loops:
Weave loops into “cable knit” pattern as follows:
Beginning with bottom loops, cross one over the other to form an “X”, then thread the second row loops through the bottom row loops on their corresponding sides. Next, thread the third row loops through the corresponding loops directly below. Lastly, cross the top loops one over the other to form a second “X”. Remember what position the top loops need to be in as you continue crocheting row 13, where the loops will be stitched into their final position.

The vertical design should resemble a cable knit pattern like this:

X
I I two X’s with parallel bars in between
X

Glove Continued:
Round 13: Hdc in each of the first 14 sts, hdc through the first loop of the upper “X” of the vertical cable knit design AND simultaneously INTO the next st, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, hdc through the next loop and into the next st as before, hdc into each of the last 3 sts.
Round 14: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, FO.

Thumb:
Round 1: Join yarn to lower row of thumb hole opening and hdc in each of the 4 stitches in the hole, pivot work and make 2 hdc into the side of the sts along the edge of the opening, pivot work to continue along top edge of thumb hole, hdc in each of the 4 back bars of the round above the hole, pivot work and make 2 hdc into the side of the sts along the opposite edge of the opening, join with a sl st, ch 1. (12 sts)
Round 2: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, FO.

Finishing:
Sew a button on the opposite cuff to fasten the cuff opening, use loop made as closure.
If desired, sl st along bottom edge of cuff on right side.

Left Hand

Cuff
Row 1: Ch 11, sc in the second ch from hook, and in each ch across, ch 1, turn.
Row 2: Working in flo, sc in each st across, ch 1, turn.
Row 3: Working in blo, sc in each st across, ch 1, turn.
Rows 4-22: Repeat rows 2 and 3, ending on a flo repeat.
Row 23: Working in blo, sc in each of the first 5 sts, ch 10, sc in each of the last 5 sts.
Pivot work in order to crochet along row edges, keep right side facing, do not break yarn.

Glove
Round 1: Working loosely, make 1 sl st in the end of each row across the unfinished edge of the cuff, join with a sl st to the first sl st made, ch 1, do not turn. (23 sts)
Round 2: Hdc in next st, and in each st around, hdc in joining sl st, (here and throughout left hand) sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc)
Round 3: Hdc in each of the first 11 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the last 8 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc and 2 ch-10 loops)
Rounds 4 and 5: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.
Round 6: Hdc in each of the first 9 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the last 10 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (23 hdc and 2 ch-10 loops)
Round 7: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.
Round 8: Hdc in each of the first 17 sts, ch 4, sk the next 4 sts, hdc in each of the remaining 2 sts, sl st to join, ch 1. (Thumb hole made)
Round 9: Hdc in each of the first 7 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, ch 10, hdc in each of the next 5 sts, hdc in each of the next 4 chs, hdc in each of the last 3 sts, sl st to join, ch 1.
Rounds 10-12: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, ch 1.

Weave loops same as right hand glove.

Round 13: Hdc in each of the first 4 sts, hdc through the first loop of the upper “X” of the vertical cable knit design AND simultaneously INTO the next st, hdc in each of the next 4 sts, hdc through the next loop and into the next st as before, hdc into each of the last 14 sts.
Round 14: Hdc in each st around, sl st to join, FO.

Complete thumb hole and finishing same as right hand glove. Weave in all ends.



Original pattern ‘Chrissy’s Cabled Fingerless Gloves’
copyright Haute Kippy by Bethany Sypolt 2016

The cable weave design used in this pattern was adapted from a technique called “Interlocking Loops” featured in the book “Crochet Stitch Guide” by Jean Leinhauser & Mary Ann Frits © 2014

Thursday, July 21, 2016

"The Tia" Bow Headband

We've all seen these super cute headbands shaped like bows circulating on the internet and social media, now it can be yours. 





My sweet cousin, let's call her... Tia! Is getting married very soon. We've been all abuzz, traveled hither and thither,  laughed, cried, tried on dresses, planned and most importantly prayed. Her time has finally come this December. Amid all this bustle and glee, I asked my bride what else I could do for her, (aside from those other maidly duties) what could I crochet for her?

She replied with a simple yet genius request. "I have this bow ear warmer headband and it's falling apart. Would you make me another?" Would I!?!? (ecstatically) I thought to myself.
I absolutely will.
And, I'll design my own!
And.... I'll make enough for the whole bridal party!
AND... I'll publish the pattern!
AND.... I'LL MAKE IT FREE!



These headbands are adorable. They're on Pinterest, they're for sale on Etsy, the paid patterns are all over Ravelry too! But you can make your own, and you can make it tonight! With a partial skein or leftover ball and one evening you can have this hot trendy item and make it in time to wear before the weather turns.

This design is a super easy beginner pattern, and for the more experienced crocheter, a fun break from large or complicated patterns- you could knock it out in an hour!

Makes a great and heartfelt homemade gift too! *Wink *Wink! I'll be popping these babies out in a rainbow of colors, using every bit in my stash. I might get crazy and try out some variegated yarns too!


So let me know what you think of this design, I'd love to see what color you make, and how cute it looks on you too! Share a picture on Haute Kippy's Facebook Page when you complete this project! Leave me a comment if you like this free pattern!

If you'd like to OWN this pattern, a sleek, printer friendly, portable PDF version is available here.
Thank you for supporting Haute Kippy! I heart You!

Take Care! xo- Kip


The Tia Bow Headband Crochet Pattern



You may sell items made from this pattern, but please be courteous, always credit Haute Kippy with the original design and link to my blog when possible.

Hook: H/8 5mm
Yarn: Any Worsted
Gauge: 12 sts, 5 rows ~4” in DC
Notions: Yarn needle
Finished Dimensions: 20” around, 4 ¾ wide
Difficulty: Beginner

Notes: Alternating rows of single crochet and double crochet feature the more attractive right side of double crochet stitches. Work 14 stitches across for 42 rows, then slip stitch the ends together to form a tube. Gather the band at the seam and wrap with extra yarn to form a faux knot apx. 1” wide. A beginning crocheter who knows basic crochet terminology, how to slip stitch, single crochet and double crochet will be able to follow this pattern. To resize for a larger or smaller head, calculate number of needed rows by 2 rows = 1 ¼”.

Headband:

Chain 16
Row 1: dc in the third ch from hook, and make 1 dc in each ch across, ch 1, turn. (14 sts)
Row 2: sc in the first st (same st as turning ch here and throughout), make 1 sc in each st across, ch 2, turn.
Row 3: dc in the first st, make 1 dc in each st across, ch 1, turn.
Rows 4-42: Repeat rows 2 and 3 respectively, ending on a row 2 repeat. Do not ch 2 at last row repeat.

Finishing:

Align ends together, matching stitches across with right side facing out. Working through both layers at the same time, insert hook through the first sts and sl st the two sides together. Continue slip stitching the ends together, keeping stitches on both sides aligned with each other. At row end, make one final sl st.

Break yarn leaving a very long tail, 12” - 18”. Cinch the headband at the center seam and wrap yarn around snugly, but not too tightly. Continue wrapping the yarn tail, creating a faux knot apx. 1” wide, which makes the headband look like a bow. Securely weave in ends.

Original pattern ‘The Tia Bow Headband’
copyright Haute Kippy by Bethany Sypolt 2016

Friday, July 1, 2016

The Patchwork Spangled Banner Afghan

Summertime is season of fun, and everyone feels patriotic especially around Independence Day.



I've designed and created my very first afghan in honor of our nations great flag. I came up with the idea for a patchwork-type flag design before, but I was never able to dedicate time to fully conceptualizing it. Now the time has come! 


The Patchwork Spangled Banner Afghan was crafted especially for my family reunion coming up in August. It's going to be my contribution to raising funds to support future reunions. I donated my love, time and skill (and of course the yarn!) to be raffled off and won by one lucky member of our family.


And of course as a sign of my love for all you happy hookers out there, I've written and published the pattern too! As always, it's FREE for you! 

This afghan is crocheted in what I call "strips". Though it appears to be made from 24 individual squares, I actually just change color back and forth in one long continuous strip, horizontally along the blanket. Make four strips and then sew them together to complete the faux flag look!


I hope everyone enjoys crocheting their very own fun flag-inspired throw blanket this summer.
Please enjoy the pattern and be sure to add it to your Ravelry Queue! I'm available to help with any questions, as you begin your project! Please leave me a comment and let me know what you think of this pattern!

A portable, clean viewing, printer friendly PDF download is available now! New from Haute Kippy for your hooking pleasure!

Click Here to Get the PDF


Have a wonderful summer! 

xo- Kip


Patchwork Spangled Banner Free Pattern:



You may sell items made from this pattern, but please be courteous, always credit Haute Kippy with the original design and link to my blog when possible.


Original pattern ‘The Patchwork Spangled Banner Afghan’

copyright Haute Kippy by Bethany Sypolt 2016



Hook: M/9mm & G6/4mm
Yarn: Red Heart Super Saver
4 skeins Cherry Red
3 skeins White
2 skein Soft Navy
1 skein Gold
Gauge: 8 sts, 6 rows = 4” in HDC
Notions: Yarn needle
Difficulty: Intermediate
Finished dimensions: 43” x 60”


Notes:
  1. Afghan is crocheted with two strands held together, one from each of two skeins in varying colors. In order to crochet with 2 strands on the gold skein, use both the inner and outer strands held together, unwinding simultaneously.
  2. Constructed in horizontal strips containing blocks of 20 sts by 15 rows, changing one strand’s color after 15 rows and continuing on for a total of four strips, each with six- 20x15 blocks. The four strips are then sewn together.
  3. Color changes are made in the last stitch of the 15th row of each color block as follows: in the last st of row 15, yo, draw up a loop, drop old color(s) keeping loops already on hook, pick up new color(s), yo and draw through loops on hook. Cut dropped color(s) leaving a tail long enough to weave in.
  4. There will be many tails to weave in as afghan progresses through color changes, it is recommended to weave-as-you-go, pausing to weave after the first two or three rows of the next color block of the strip.
  5. Edging in gold is optional, as some fancy American flags have gold fringe, and even tassels as a decoration. This also helps to seal side edges for a more finished look.
  6. Stars are individually crocheted appliques, hand-sewn onto the starfield of the “flag”.


The chart below illustrates the 24 blocks of the afghan,
and denotes their corresponding color combinations.



Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
Block 5
Block 6
Strip 1
Blue
Blue
Blue
White
Blue
Blue
Red
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Strip 2
Blue
White
Blue
Blue
Blue
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Red
Red
Strip 3
Red
Red
Red
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Strip 4
Red
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Red
Red
Red
White
Red
Red


Strip 1


M/9mm hook
Chain 21 using 2 strands of blue held together.


Block 1:
Row 1: hdc into the second ch from hook, and in each remaining ch across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Row 2: hdc into each st across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Rows 3-14: repeat row 2.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of blue, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Continue on, making one long strip through all color block changes. See #3 in notes for details about color changes. Refer back to color chart for help in understanding color block pattern.

Block 2:
Repeat rows 1-14 using white and blue held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of blue, ch 1, turn.


Block 3:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of blue held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop both blue strands, add 1 strand of white and 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 4:
Repeat rows 1-14 using white and red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 5:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 6:
Repeat rows 1-14 using white and red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across (20 sts), fo, weave in ends.


Strip 2


Chain 21 using 1 strand of blue and 1 strand of white held together.


Block 1:
Row 1: hdc into the second ch from hook, and in each remaining ch across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Row 2: hdc into each st across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Rows 3-14: repeat row 2.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of blue, ch 1, turn.


Block 2:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of blue held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of blue, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 3:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of blue and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop blue and white, add 2 strands of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 4:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 5:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 6:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across (20 sts), fo, weave in ends.


Strip 3


Chain 21 using 2 strands of red held together.


Block 1:
Row 1: hdc into the second ch from hook, and in each remaining ch across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Row 2: hdc into each st across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Rows 3-14: repeat row 2.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 2:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 3:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 4:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 5:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 6:
Repeat rows 1-14 using white and red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across (20 sts), fo, weave in ends.


Strip 4


Chain 21 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.


Block 1:
Row 1: hdc into the second ch from hook, and in each remaining ch across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Row 2: hdc into each st across, ch 1, turn. (20 sts)
Rows 3-14: repeat row 2.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 2:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 3:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 4:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop 1 strand of red, add 1 strand of white, ch 1, turn.


Block 5:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 1 strand of red and 1 strand of white held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across, at last st, drop white, add 1 strand of red, ch 1, turn.


Block 6:
Repeat rows 1-14 using 2 strands of red held together.
Row 15: hdc into each st across (20 sts), fo, weave in ends.


Finishing


Arrange strips in order from 1 to 4 as reflected by the chart. Sew strips together using red yarn. Avoid a common whip stitch, instead make small stitches on the sides of the strip, weaving the needle back and forth between the strips and pulling them together. This will prevent any obvious seams.


Stars


G6/4mm Hook
White yarn


Form a magic ring.
Round 1: Ch 2, make 10 dc into magic ring, sl st to first dc to join, pull loop tightly closed.
Round 2: Ch 4, being sure to stitch into the back bump of the chain, *sc into the second ch from hook, hdc into the next ch, dc into the final ch, sk the next st from the previous row of dc’s and sl st into the next st* (point of star made), ch 4, *repeat* four more times, sl st into the last st, fo, leaving a long tail (~12”) for sewing.


Make 30 stars.
Sew stars to afghan, 5 to a block positioning them as follows: one in each corner, and one in the middle. Be sure to sew securely, especially the points of the stars. Take care not to let the white of the sewing tail bleed through to opposite side of afghan.


Size stars up or down for desired effect by changing hook or yarn.


Edging

Using 2 strands of gold held together, join to one edge on right side of afghan and sc evenly around entire edge, making 2 sc in corner sts. Raw edge rule of thumb is apx. 3 sts over every 2 rows of hdc. Fo, weave in ends.